App Sends Out Alert When Someone Needs CPR

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BEDFORD, Ohio-- No doubt, CPR and minutes matter when someone is having a heart attack. There is new technology that sends out an alert that someone is in cardiac arrest. It means anyone can be a lifesaver if they have a smartphone.

The new Chagrin Valley Dispatcher Center, now in the basement of Bedford Medical Center, opened this week. It serves ten communities.

PulsePoint is connected to the 911 calls that come in. It is a new app for smartphones that sends out an alert that someone is in cardiac arrest.

Lt. Nick DiCicco with the Orange Police Dept. oversees the dispatch center. He said the PulsePoint app works within a quarter-mile radius of the person’s phone. “It automatically sends the call information up to the PulsePoint servers and the PulsePoint servers then deploy it out to anybody who has downloaded the app,” Lt. DiCicco explained.

It's for anyone who is CPR-certified and willing to try to save a life before EMS arrives.

Dan Ellenberger, University Hospitals Director of EMS Training and Disaster Preparedness, said in cardiac emergency situations it's about getting hands on the chest. “We trained 14,000 people last year in CPR. So, there are 14,000 responders out there that can actually save a life if they knew that someone was having a cardiac arrest," Ellenberger added.

You don’t have to live in the Chagrin Valley area to download the PulsePoint app on your phone. "You could be visiting Orange Place in Orange Village and having dinner at the Bahama Breeze and if we are responding to that area and someone is in cardiac arrest -- you have the app; you will be alerted," Lt. DiCicco said.

When PulsePoint sends out the alert, it will also show where to find the nearest defibrillator for that call. Lt. DiCicco says PulsePoint has been used in the Columbus area this past year and is credited with saving about a dozen lives. "When an ambulance gets called out it can be between a 4-6 minutes response time and if we can get a lay person there within 1 to 2 minutes to start CPR and maybe do a defibrillation -- it will absolutely save a life,” Lt. DiCicco added.

PulsePoint is free and available through iTunes and Google Play.

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