Weeden to Help with Oklahoma Relief

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CLEVELAND -- You could pardon Browns QB Brandon Weeden for having a tough time keeping his head in practice this week during Browns OTAs.

The devastation in Moore, Oklahoma has been weighing heavily on his mind.

"It actually went right through my wife's hometown," Weeden said following Thursday's practice. "Fourth Street, the path they keep talking about, my mother-in-law lives on Main, which is four blocks north of it, and my brother-in-law lives two blocks south of it. It went right over the top of them. Very, very fortunate to have no injuries and everybody's safe."

You could imagine the tense moments the couple experienced when the tornado wove its path of destruction earlier this week.

Brandon, who hails from Edmond, Oklahoma, said he has been in contact with Oklahoma Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb and he plans to be there this weekend to help.

"I'll do anything, whether it's getting in the rubble and doing whatever, it doesn't matter," said Weeden. "I'll be there to help."

Weeden's wife, Melanie, drove 17 straight hours to Oklahoma from Northeast Ohio and arrived very late Wednesday night.  She spoke to Fox 8 reporters Gabe Spiegel and P.J. Ziegler while seeing firsthand the incredible destruction on Thursday.

"I really try not to set any expectations. You could watch the news and see how terrible it looked, but I was talking to my brother and he said to just prepare yourself because you can't imagine what it's really like once you get here and see it in person. Pictures and videos don't do give it any justice."

Weeden said family members were able to take cover in time.

"My brother-in-law got in the car and drove away from it," he said. "My mother-in-law works in the administration building for Moore Public Schools, so she was in a basement, fortunately."

Brandon remember as a 14-year-old being in a tunnel to survive the "May 3rd Tornado."  He realizes they are part of living in central Oklahoma.

"When they do come, you hope they are never as big as this one," Weeden said.

*For extended coverage on this story, click HERE or follow the latest from KFOR in Oklahoma City.