School closings due to heat wave

SEA on Strike Meeting: ‘We’re Too Far Apart’

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STRONGSVILLE, Ohio-- The two sides in the Strongsville teachers' strike met Wednesday evening, on day three of the strike.

According to Todd Jake, Labor Relations Consultant for the Ohio Education Association, the Strongsville Education Association and the superintendent met to explore how to move forward with negotiations.

Tracy Linscott, President of the Strongsville Education Association, talked to FOX 8 Wednesday night after the meeting, saying, "There was really not a lot of discussion. They're not interested in making a counter proposal to our counter and therefore there is no need for additional meetings to be set up.  We're too far apart."

Nearly 400 members of the Strongsville Education Association hit the picket line on Monday after operating without a contract for months.

Negotiations between the Board of Education and teachers union fell apart and salary and working conditions are said to be among the issues.

Meantime, striking these days involves a war a words -- behind keyboards and fake names.

Facebook and Twitter were not even around 10 years ago, but today it’s fair game to let your voice be heard even if your name is John Doe.

“Every day the press will slowly stop covering the unemployed teachers.  Hopefully there comes a day when the striking teachers will be replaced and they’ll realize that everyone’s replaceable,” reads Annette Potter, a parent in Strongsville.  She has three kids in the district.

She’s seen all the sites where parents and children like to post their frustrations about the strike.  Facebook, Twitter and the Strongsville Patch seem to be the hotspots.

Annette is one of the brave ones. She freely admitted to FOX 8 that she’s posted under a fake name.  It’s mostly for venting.  “Our school system doesn’t have the money that the teachers want and I don’t know that the teachers see that.  Maybe there’s a compromise.  They had a Cadillac plan.  We can’t afford it anymore.”

She says, for the most part, the teachers are staying quiet; most parents hit Facebook and the kids are all over Twitter.

Superintendent John Krupinski said, “Cell phones are not allowed in class, but kids can post during lunch and I don’t see a problem with that.  I will never try to squash your first amendment rights.”

*Read more on the strike here*