Dick Goddard’s Hometown Hero

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MEDINA, Ohio -- "We only take abuse, neglect, cruelty, injured and abandoned animals.  So what we see here is pretty much the worst of the worst," said Stephanie Moore, the executive director of the Medina County SPCA.

It’s a job she’s held for a little over two years … and it’s not easy, but she’s willing to do it.

That’s why Fox 8’s Dick Goddard chose Moore as his Hometown Hero.

“It can be very emotional at times. We all have days when we all need an extra hug,” Moore said of her work.

She got into the business after Hurricane Katrina struck.

Moore made trips south where she volunteered to help the animals in need.

"When I saw some of the television footage of the animals, and I saw it first hand, how many people had to leave their animals behind, I knew at that time I needed to do something more,” she explained.

Her path eventually led to northeast Ohio, where she spends about 60 hours at the shelter each week.

Her leadership makes a big difference to the small staff, and the animals.

“I love working with Stephanie; I really do," said Erica Moehring, the animal care and volunteer coordinator. “She’s very caring and very knowledgeable. She’s taught me a lot of things.”

“She listens, she supports what I do, and she’s always got my back. So I’m never afraid to jump in and investigate and do what we need to do for the animals because she’s there,” added Mary Jo Johnson, a humane officer.

With Moore leading the way, the animals are in good hands, and will continue to be for a very long time.

“As long as there’s animals that need me and I’m capable of doing what I do, I will continue to do it,” Moore said.  “It gives me so much joy and so much peace to be able to give back in a way that I love.”

The Medina County SPCA and shelters everywhere are always in need of volunteers. 

If you’d like to lend a hand, click HERE or contact the shelter in your hometown.