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Sonic Boom From Meteor Wakes Region

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Andria Borba, KTXL, Reporting, Courtesy CNN

No need to call 911 or enlist Bruce Willis to save the world, but a meteor shower certainly rocked Northern California Sunday morning.

Reports of a sonic boom came in from all over California and northern Nevada just before 8 a.m.

In Pollock Pines, Annette Yoakum woke up out of a dead sleep.

“I woke up with this boom, I thought something fell on our house,” Yoakum told FOX40.

In Lathrop, Pamella Farley was driving to work and actually witnessed the rare daylight shower.

“I saw this fireball streak across the sky and then it curved down and it exploded,” says Farley.

Even FOX40’s Dennis Shanahan felt the meteor shower from Lake Tahoe.

“It shook the house and the dog freaked out. I thought something either hit the house, like I don’t know…like something hit the house or it was an earthquake,” Shanahan said.

The Lyrid meteor shower happens every April and lights up the sky worldwide. Sunday’s event was even captured by an amateur photographer in Hungary.

“It leaves a cloud of debris and we’re just moving through that debris right now,” says Tom Dang of the National Weather Service.

The comet known as ‘Thatcher’ is causing the ruckus.

“People actually getting their windows rattled because of these sonic booms. It’s not because of meteorites reaching the ground, it’s because of meteorites reaching the speed of sound and breaking that sound barrier in the sky before burning up.”

Lyrid meteor showers typically last 10 days. The National Weather Service expects streaking meteorites will be visible for the next few days at least.

The meteor shower didn’t just rattle windows – it lit up the boards in 911 dispatch centers. The Cal Fire command center in Camino, which handles calls for El Dorado and Amador counties, received more than 30 calls about the shower and resulting sonic boom.